2018-08-15 14:40:53

This is the most liveable city in the world

Vienna, Austria, may be most widely known for its famous Opera House, historic museums and coffee shop culture dating back over a hundred years. But now it's also the most liveable city in the world.

The European city was ranked No. 1 in the world in The Global Liveability Index 2018, an annual report by The Economist Intelligence Unit released August 14. It's the first time the city ranked as the most livable out of 140 cities surveyed, displacing Melbourne, Australia from the top spot, which had a record seven-year winning streak.

For its methodology, The EIU assessed which locations around the world provide the best or the worst living conditions. Every city is assigned a rating of relative comfort for over 30 qualitative and quantitative factors across five broad categories: stability (looking at things like crime, conflict and terrorism), healthcare, culture and environment, education, and infrastructure.

Vienna and Melbourne scored maximum points of 100 in the healthcare, education and infrastructure categories, though Vienna edged forward in the stability category with 100 points (Melbourne ranked 95). In the culture and environment category, Vienna scored 96.3. The city's overall score was 99.1 (Melbourne scored 98.4).

Other cities in the top 10 included Osaka, Japan (97.7); Calgary, Canada (97.5); Sydney, Australia (97.4); Vancouver, Canada (97.3); Toronto, Canada (97.2); Tokyo, Japan (97.2); Copenhagen, Denmark (96.8) and Adelaide, Australia (96.6).

Vienna has a small population of 1.8 million people. It's known for its Baroque architecture and imperial palaces, many with parts dating back to the 13th century, like Hofburg Imperial Palace, or the Schonbrunn Palace from the 17th century.

The coffee culture is renowned in Vienna, and it's dates back 100 years, with many historic coffee shops as attractions, like Cafe Landtmann, founded in 1873, and Cafe Central, established in 1876 and visited by famous (and infamous) people from Sigmund Freud to Adolf Hitler.

Source: economist.com



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